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Setting the Art World Ablaze

November 18, 2021

Upon discovering a series of political cartoons mocking artists in 18th– and 19th-century France in 2010, UNC-Chapel Hill art historian Kathryn Desplanque couldn’t stop searching for them. Now, she has amassed more than 500 and is using them to redefine … Continued

A Project of Her Own

October 20, 2021

Most UNC-Chapel Hill PhD students oversee their own research projects for their dissertations. But Kriddie Whitmore did it in a foreign country — and with the added challenges of a language barrier, bad weather, and limited equipment. This past summer, … Continued

It Runs in the Family

August 17, 2021

“They’re a little competitive when they play,” jokes Diane Youngstrom, who stands next to her sister Kay as they watch their parents from the porch of their family home in Chapel Hill. A snap sounds, and Eric leans over the … Continued

The P’urhépecha Podcasts

April 15, 2021

Through community radio and podcasts, Maria Gutierrez strives to preserve her ancestral language and identity — that of an indigenous people from Michoacán, Mexico, called the P’urhépecha. Maria Gutierrez is descended from the P’urhépecha, an indigenous group from a region along … Continued

Spiritual Evolution

April 8, 2021

Through study of a “new” Japanese religion called Tenrikyo and centuries of Japanese history, doctoral student Timothy Smith strives to understand how cultural shifts morph belief systems across generations. The bronze felt cold and gritty under Timothy Smith’s hand. He … Continued

For the Love of Language

June 17, 2020

Since 1984, over 100,000 Karen refugees have fled their homeland of Myanmar to escape civil war. Since then, more than 40,000 have resettled in the U.S., and more than 5,000 live in North Carolina. Such displacement greatly affects lives, and … Continued

Mastering Mandarin for Business

February 14, 2020

With nearly 1 billion speakers, Mandarin Chinese is the most spoken language in the world. That’s almost 15 percent of the global population — and why UNC Asian studies professor Yi Zhou has spent the past decade teaching advanced Mandarin … Continued

Carolina Undergraduates Study Climate Change in Ecuador

October 28, 2019

For thousands of years, the northern Andes Mountains have acted as a carbon sink, preserving organic matter as thick soil. As the planet warms, what will happen to all that carbon? This past summer, Carolina undergraduates traveled to Ecuador to … Continued

Rachel Willis Helps Port Communities Cope with the Impact of Climate Change

October 6, 2017

Orange traffic cones surround a fluorescent yellow-garbed construction worker on NC-12. He raises his hand perpendicular to the roadway, signaling to slow down with a weathered red stop sign. As cars speed past in the left-hand lane, enormous cranes on ocean barges lift heavy beams onto a bridge being built alongside the existing one.