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November 2020

Virtual: Environmentalism, Fantasy and Intersectionality: A Comparison Between the US and the EU

November 5 - November 6

Note: This event has been rescheduled to November 5-6, 2020. It was originally planned for March 26-27, 2020. This event will be held virtually. All times are in US ET. This conference takes up the question of how fantasy and science fiction are used to address minority issues, specifically as they relate to environmental concerns in the European Union and the US. Scholars will gather from the EU and the US to present and discuss work on female and ethnic…

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Virtual: Challenging Conversations: Post-Colonialism, Antisemitism, and the Holocaust: The Achille Mbembe Case in Germany

November 20 at 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

The Zoom URL for each NCGS seminar will be communicated two weeks before the event via the NCGS list serve. If you are not on this list serve please contact the NCGS  organizers Max H. Lazar, (maxlazar@live.unc.edu) and Michael Skalski, (mskalski@live.unc.edu) and ask them to be added this list serve or request the URL for the specific event. This spring has witnessed heated debate in Germany about the campaign to disinvite Achille Mbembe, the South African-based Cameroonian theorist, as the keynote speaker at…

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December 2020

Virtual: The Sociology of Empire: German and Habsburg Theories of Multinational Statehood, 1848-1914 Seminar

December 4 at 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Over the past twenty years, historians have dramatically reevaluated the Habsburg Monarchy. Whereas scholars once characterized the Monarchy as a “prison of nations,” they now emphasize the effectiveness of its institutions and its subjects’ loyalty to the dynasty and indifference to nationalist propaganda. And yet, despite its stability and “modernity,” Habsburg Austria came to be categorized in the decades before World War I as an “empire,” an archaic polity fundamentally different from Western European “nation-states.” This lecture will examine how…

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