Their Lives Matter

May 20, 2020

Angela Stuesse first met Celso Mendoza, an immigrant worker at a chicken processing plant in Forest, Mississippi, in 2002 when she was a young graduate student. He had migrated from Veracruz, Mexico, to work in the chicken plant for $6 an … Continued

The Disease Ecologist: An Interview with Michael Emch

May 11, 2020

In late February, as the first reports of COVID-19 cases started to spring up across the country, Michael Emch was beginning a unit on emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases with 50 undergraduate students in his “Health and Medical Geography” class. “Teaching about … Continued

Class of 2020: Remember Your Resiliency and Strength

May 4, 2020

Shai Nickerson’s Carolina story is one of extremes: She once spent two weeks living in a mountain cave in Nepal as part of a Buddhist meditation retreat, taking a vow of silence, shutting down all technology and subsisting on only … Continued

Exploring Contagion Through the Lens of Shakespeare

April 20, 2020

“Contagion and the Shakespeare Stage”, co-edited by Mary Floyd-Wilson, Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor and chair of the department of English and comparative literature, is a collection of essays that explores what constituted contagion in the minds of early theater-goers in the … Continued

New Revelations in Nepal

January 31, 2020

Windy. Cold. Wet. Those were the conditions one October day as a team of Carolina researchers tried to retrieve instruments left behind 15 months earlier in a remote lake in Sagarmatha National Park, the region of Nepal dominated by Mount … Continued

Celebrating Carolina Firsts

January 21, 2020

As junior Darian Abernathy stood at the United States-Mexico border listening to a presentation by a medic with Cruz Roja (the Mexican Red Cross), she was captivated by the seven principles emblazoned in red on the speaker’s white vest: humanity, … Continued

A Homecoming for a Convergent Scientist

December 10, 2019

In 1999, the first time Caleb King saw Shyira Hospital in northwestern Rwanda, every window was broken. The X-ray machine was smashed to pieces. The facility had no electricity or doctors — not even beds, mattresses or blankets. Scores of … Continued