FedEx Global Education Center, DeBerry Board Room 3009

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Name:
FedEx Global Education Center, DeBerry Board Room 3009
Phone:
+1.919.962.2435
Address:
301 Pittsboro St.
Chapel Hill, NC 27516 United States

Upcoming Events At This Venue

September 20, 2019

Martin Seeleib-Kaiser is an associate fellow and professor of comparative public policy at the Eberhard Karls University Tübingen. Initially appointed as university lecturer at the University of Oxford in 2004, he held various appointments in the department and fellowships at Green Templeton College as well as at St Cross College. From 2013 to 2017 he was the Barnett Professor of Comparative Social Policy and Politics, and from 2011 to 2015, he served as head of department. You can find further information about him on his website at the EKUT.

This event is supported by a College Strategic Partnership Award and the UNC College of Arts and Sciences.

The lecture series is designed to enhance students’ understanding of transatlantic studies through direct contact with academic practitioners. It is particularly targeted towards students in the TransAtlantic Masters program and undergraduate majors in Contemporary European Studies, but is open to all University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students and the general public.

Start: September 20, 2019 @ 12:15 pm
End: September 20, 2019 @ 1:45 pm

September 26, 2019

Popular elections in Russia have often been replaced by some forms of indirect elections or appointments at both regional and municipal level. Scholars have studied various effects such institutional changes have on the characteristics of political leaders. Guzel Garifullina builds a theory connecting leader selection institutions with political ambition and explores whether the observed changes lead to self-selection of more risk-seeking or more risk-averse individuals into candidacy. She tests the theory in a laboratory experiment staged in Russia.

Guzel Garifullina is a Ph.D. candidate in the political science department. Her work focuses on political elite behavior and policy choices, with application to subnational level politics in Russia. Before coming to Carolina, she worked as a research fellow at the National Research University Higher School of Economics in Moscow.

The Carolina Seminar: Russia and Its Empires, East and West is co-sponsored by the Carolina Seminar Program, the UNC-Chapel Hill Department of History and the Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies. Please note that the participants will give an overview of their projects but will not read a formal paper. Instead, papers or book chapters will be circulated ahead of time to those who are interested in attending and participating in the discussion. Please contact Dr. Eren Tasar for more information.

Start: September 26, 2019 @ 6:30 pm
End: September 26, 2019 @ 7:30 pm

October 10, 2019

For millions of Habsburg citizens, civilians and soldiers alike, the First World War was a war of both mobility and captivity. While soldiers were notoriously paralyzed in trenches on the Western front, the armies of the Central Powers and the Russian steamroller pushed each other back and forth across contested territory, sending civilians in flight. At least 600,000 Austrian civilians fled or were evacuated from the front during the war. State officials scrambled to address the crisis with an ambitious network of refugee camps scattered throughout the Empire’s interior. Austro-Hungarian troops meanwhile captured its own territory along its vast frontiers, and struggled to establish new regimes, extract resources and pacify local populations. This war of movement was a prelude to captivity for at least 2.7 million Austro-Hungarian soldiers whose service ended in Prisoners of War camps, mostly in Russia. They shared the experience of internment with thousands of civilians, enemy nationals, and soldiers who were interned within the Empire, and with the hundreds of thousands of refugees who began to experience the refugee camps created to care for them as a form of imprisonment. The Austro-Hungarian Army and bureaucracy saw this mobility as an opportunity as well as a crisis. It was an occasion to extend an imagined civilizing mission toward captive lands, soldiers and citizens.

Tara Zahra is a professor of history at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on the transnational history of modern Europe, migration, the family, nationalism and humanitarianism. Zahra’s most recent publications include The Great Departure: Mass Migration and the Making of the Free World (Norton, 2016) and, with Leora Auslander, Objects of War: The Material Culture of Conflict and Displacement (Cornell, 2018).

The Carolina Seminar: Russia and Its Empires, East and West is co-sponsored by the Carolina Seminar Program, the Department of History, and the Center for Slavic, Eurasian and East European Studies. Please note that the participants will give an overview of their projects, but will not read a formal paper. Instead, papers or book chapters will be circulated ahead of time to those who are interested in attending and participating in the discussion. Please contact Dr. Eren Tasar for more information.

Start: October 10, 2019 @ 6:30 pm
End: October 10, 2019 @ 7:30 pm

October 11, 2019

Melina Juárez Pérez is a graduate of the TAM program and an instructor of political science and women, gender and sexuality studies at Western Washington University. She utilizes theories that speak to and incorporate the lived realities of marginalized peoples; theories such as embodiment, historical trauma, decolonization, intersectionality and Marxism. Her work aims at developing a critical understanding of the structures of power and privilege that inform policy and ultimately affect immigrant health.

The lecture series is designed to enhance students’ understanding of transatlantic studies through direct contact with academic practitioners. It is particularly targeted towards students in the TransAtlantic Masters program and undergraduate majors in Contemporary European Studies, but is open to all University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students and the general public.

Start: October 11, 2019 @ 12:15 pm
End: October 11, 2019 @ 1:45 pm

October 24, 2019

This talk will address the east-central European origins of development concepts that came to dominate the postwar world. Treating social science as a situated phenomenon, shaped by the twentieth century’s violent politics, Malgorzata Mazurek aims to explain why and how developmental thought became the key instrument of defining, building and contesting new nation-states in Europe after World War I—and then globally after World War II. At the core of her discussion is a close-knit group of Polish economists, mostly Jewish. Dubbed “Polish Keynesians,” these activist scholars developed a way of a transforming a small, poor, multiethnic state into a self-expanding economy, and thus an ethnically inclusive polity.

Małgorzata Mazurek is an associate professor of Polish studies at Columbia University. She specializes in modern history of Poland and East Central Europe. Her research interests include history of social sciences, international development, social history of labor and consumption in the twentieth-century Poland and Polish-Jewish relations. Her book, Society in Waiting Lines: On Experiences of Shortages in Postwar Poland (Warsaw: Trio 2010; in Polish) was shortlisted among the ten best books on contemporary Polish history.

This talk is made possible by a University Studies Grant from the International Visegrad Fund.

Start: October 24, 2019 @ 12:30 pm
End: October 24, 2019 @ 2:00 pm

November 15, 2019

Following four years as chief of group programs and public inquiries in UN Visitors Services, Kathryn Good has returned to the Civil Society Unit in the UN Department of Global Communications, where she now oversees civil society liaison functions. From 2010-2013, Kathryn managed English language and communications programs globally for the UN Secretariat. Prior to joining the UN, Kathryn was director of international programs and language area studies at Brown University for ten years. Kathryn has held academic appointments at Boston University, Middlebury-Monterey Institute of International Studies, Brown University, the University of Rhode Island and Georgetown University and has taught a range of courses in UN peacekeeping operations and in schools and universities around the world.

The lecture series is designed to enhance students’ understanding of transatlantic studies through direct contact with academic practitioners. It is particularly targeted towards students in the TransAtlantic Masters program and undergraduate majors in Contemporary European Studies, but is open to all University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students and the general public.

Start: November 15, 2019 @ 12:15 pm
End: November 15, 2019 @ 1:45 pm