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Three UNC Students Named Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellows

November 8, 2016
UNC Global



Three students from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill were named 2016 Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellows Program, making Carolina one of the top producers of Fulbright-Hays DDRA fellows.

UNC was awarded $109,256 in funding for the program by the U.S. Department of Education. These fellowships allow doctoral students to pursue dissertation research abroad in foreign languages and area studies for 6 to 12 months. During this time, fellows are able to deepen their subject knowledge and develop capabilities not available to them through opportunities in the U.S.

The Fulbright Program, of which the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Program is a part, dates to 1946 when the late-U.S. Senator J. William Fulbright sponsored legislation to create the program as a means to increase mutual understanding between America and the rest of the world. For more information about the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellows program at UNC, visit the Center for Global Initiatives website.

The 2016 UNC Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellows are listed below in alphabetical order.

2016 UNC Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellows

Dakota Irvin is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History from York, Maine. Irvin’s dissertation, titled “Revolving Doors of Power: How Revolutionary Yekaterinburg Became Sverdlovsk,” provides a political, social and cultural history of Yekaterinburg during the years of the Russian Revolution and Civil War and its transformation into Sverdlovsk in 1924, with a focus on local institutions’ responses to the disorder of revolution as a way to examine the contested creation of new forms of order.

Angus Lyall is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Geography by from Cotuit, Massachusetts. Lyall’s dissertation, titled “Urban Aspirations in the Amazon: Governance Territory and Indigeneity on an Ecuadorian Resource Frontier,” explores how oil production has gained legitimacy on previously contested resource frontiers in the northern Ecuadorian Amazon. It examines the Ecuadorian state-run “Millennium Cities” program, an infrastructural development and urban resettlement program geared toward indigenous communities who embrace urban futures in exchange for their consent to oil extraction.

Virginia Olmsted is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History from Tazewell, Virginia. Olmstead’s dissertation, titled “Soviet by Design Fashion Consumption and International Competition,” examines the evolution of the Soviet fashion industry, focusing on the primary state institutions for fashion, the houses of design. The idea that designers needed to develop a new style emerged after World War II, with the creation of the General Soviet House of Design in 1948. During this period, Soviet designers endeavored to create a uniquely Soviet style through the adaptation of national and ethnic traditions.

 

Center for Global Initiatives contact: Iyman Gaspard, iyman.gaspard@unc.edu, 919.864.6842

Media contact: Katie Bowler Young, kby@unc.edu, 919.962.4504


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